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Double threat for island nations rich in critical minerals: climate change and the consequences of extractive industries

by Siddhi Ashar, Sep 20
1 minute read

Pacific nations are extraordinarily rich in critical minerals. But mining them may take a terrible toll.

green trees on island surrounded by water during daytime

So what?

Rising sea levels, more powerful cyclones, and droughts threaten low-lying nations, while increased pressure to mine in regions like the Solomon Islands or Papua New Guinea that have tensions that can be radicalized by mining.

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by Siddhi Ashar Spotted 47 signals

With a background in international studies and filmmaking, Siddhi works with the Futures Centre team to creatively push our current imaginaries and create more positive visions of futures rooted in equity. Her works centers around challenging common narratives and working agilely to bring forth more representative ones. Through her role at the Futures Centre, she focuses on the answering the question, how can better climate communication and visioning help stakeholders work together and act intently, empathetically and urgently?

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