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Scientists discover a species of bacteria that breaks down PET plastic

by Futures Centre, Dec 5
1 minute read

A recent publication in the journal Science has led scientists to believe we might have come full circle in the plastic conundrum: first developing a material that cannot biodegrade, then developing a way to enable it. The starting point? The discovery of a plastic-eating bacteria. The bacteria eats the polymer PET which the majority of plastic bottles are made from.

Could a new plastic-eating bacteria help combat this pollution scourge?

Nature has begun to fight back against the vast piles of filth dumped into its soils, rivers and oceans by evolving a plastic-eating bacteria – the first known to science. In a report published in the journal Science, a team of Japanese researchers described a species of bacteria that can break the molecular bonds of one of the world’s most-used plastics – polyethylene terephthalate, also known as PET or polyester.

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